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Patent for Sale:

Systems Verbally Asking "WHO'S CALLING" Prior to Telephone Answering    

Caller ID is FLAWED - identifying the calling phone NOT THE ACTUAL CALLER. "WHO'S CALLING" employed in tandem with caller ID seamlessly provides that the "CALLER" is ALWAYS known prior to answering.

Overview

The patented technology has the ability to identify ALL callers ALL of the time and would benefit a handset manufacturer looking for a valuable new feature and would also benefit a telephone server that provides enhancement features to telephone user who choose to join and become their customers.

Answering machine type call screening and caller ID comprise today’s preferred methods for identifying a caller. Answering machine type call screening is flawed in that screening occurs only after a set number of telephone rings has concluded and only when the caller decides to leave a message. OFTEN, the caller doesn't wait around long enough for the answering machine to answer or simply opts not to leave a message.

Caller ID is flawed in that the provided identity information comprises the owner and/or phone number of the calling telephone. VERY OFTEN, the caller is calling from someone else’s phone, a pay phone, an out-of-area phone, a family-shared phone or the caller ID information has been blocked or has been spoofed.

"WHO'S CALLING, and particularly "WHO'S CALLING" employed in tandem with caller ID, seamlessly rectifies the above-described flaws of answering machine type call screening and caller ID. "Who's Calling, and particularly "Who's Calling" employed in tandem with caller ID, also provides the telephone user with the ability to sample a caller's temperament prior to answering the incoming call.

"WHO'S CALLING, and particularly "WHO'S CALLING" employed in tandem with caller ID, enables any and all callers to be conclusively identified.
"WHO'S CALLING" employed in tandem with caller ID operates like this: During the incoming call, caller ID information is provided at the telephone. If from the caller ID the user is unable to ascertain the identity of the caller, if from the caller ID the user is able to ascertain the identity of the caller but would like to sample the caller’s mood, or if from the caller ID the user is unable to ascertain the identity of the caller and also would like to sample the caller’s mood, the user then touches a "WHO'S CALLING" icon. The system responds by answering the call and playing a message to the caller. For example: "My I-Phone, WHO'S CALLING?" or "My Samsung Galaxy, WHO'S CALLING?" or "My Microsoft Lumina, WHO'S CALLING?" or "My Google Pixel, WHO'S CALLING?" (or Joe's Phone, WHO'S CALLING?" etc.).

From the message, the caller understands that they need to provide their name to complete the call. When the caller speaks their name, the name is delivered live to the user. Upon hearing the caller’s name and in the caller’s voice, the user knows with certainty whose calling and, also, has been afforded a sample of the caller’s mood. The user can then employ the name, voice and mood information in their decision whether AT THAT MOMENT IN TIME they care to answer that particular call.

(If the user decides not to answer the call, the system can play a message to the caller, for example: “My I-Phone was unable to determine WHO'S CALLING. Please feel free to call back later”; or for example: “Sorry, Nobody's Home!. Please leave a message or call back later. Thank you”. The system can then record a message left by the caller.)

Claimed in the patent are FIVE unique systems, each of the five systems verbally asking "WHO'S CALLING" prior to telephone answering. (See claims 1, 4, 7, 9 & 11.)

Primary Application of the Technology

Telephones: Both Mobile and Landline Phones

The ability to identify ALL callers ALL of the time is a technology that would benefit a handset manufacturer looking for a valuable new feature and would also benefit a telephone server that provides enhancement features to telephone user who choose to join and become their customers.

The Problem Solved by the Technology

Answering machine type call screening and caller ID comprise today’s preferred methods for identifying a caller. Answering machine type call screening is flawed in that screening occurs only after a set number of telephone rings has concluded and only when the caller decides to leave a message. Often times, the caller doesn't wait around long enough for the answering machine to answer or simply opts not to leave a message.
Caller ID is flawed in that the provided identity information comprises the owner and/or phone number of the calling telephone. VERY OFTEN, the caller is calling from someone else’s phone, a pay phone, an out-of-area phone, a family-shared phone or the caller ID information has been blocked or has been spoofed.

How the Technology Solves the Problem

"WHO'S CALLING, employed in tandem with caller ID, enables any and all callers to be seamlessly conclusively identified prior to answering a telephone call while concurrently providing a sample of a caller's temperament prior to answering the incoming call.

Competitive Advantage

The patented technology allows people to seamlessly successfully connect with unknown yet wanted callers. Conversely, it prevents people from having to waste time answering and conversing with unknown/unwanted callers or robot calls that disrupt the day.
Claimed in the patent are FIVE unique systems, each of the five systems verbally asking "WHO'S CALLING" prior to telephone answering. (See claims 1, 4, 7, 9 & 11.)

The seller would like to be granted a license back.

Additional Information

FIVE unique systems are claimed in the patent, each of the five systems verbally asking "WHO'S CALLING" prior to telephone answering. (See claims 1, 4, 7, 9 & 11.)

The patent seller is reasonable and open to all offers. Click the 'tell me more' link to learn more.

Patent Summary

U.S. Patent Classes & Classifications Covered in this listing:

Class 379: Telephonic Communications

(1) Systems, processes and instruments for the two-way electrical transmission of intelligible audio information having arbitrary content over a link including an electrical conductor, between spaced apart locations, so as to enable conversation therebetween, and intended for the private use of a listener or a group of listeners. The term "intelligible" used above is intended to include the capability for transmission of speech or the like (e.g., music), rather than restriction to a specified audible signal, such as a bell or buzzer. (2) Switching, signalling or signal transmission peculiar to, or specified as for a telephone or a telephone system, except for multiplex communications as indicated in Lines With Other Classes.

Subclass 67.1: AUDIO MESSAGE STORAGE, RETRIEVAL, OR SYNTHESIS
Subclass 68: Dynamic audio signal recording or reproduction
Subclass 70: Call intercept or answering
Subclass 76: Announcement selection or replacement
Subclass 77: Control by generated tone
Subclass 79: With specified call initiated cycle control circuitry
Subclass 88.01: Voice activation or recognition
Subclass 88.13: Multimedia system (e.g., voice output combined with fax, video, text, etc.)
Subclass 88.16: Voice message synthesis
Subclass 88.22: Message management
Subclass 373.01: Incoming call alerting
Subclass 373.02: Distinctive or selective alerting
Subclass 373.03: Registration of alerting signal in association with incoming signal
Subclass 373.04: Recording audio for use as the alerting signal
Subclass 373.05: Directing incoming call to local appliance
Subclass 374.01: Including musical sound generation
Subclass 374.02: Including audible message generation